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Community-made content which you can improve Case study from our community

How principles for joint working can be a key ingredient for success in service transformation

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This case study is part of a series looking at the role of voluntary organisations in health and social care system transformation. It was kindly supplied by Bruce Poole of Salford CVS.

Background

NHS England introduced sustainability and transformation partnerships (STPs) in 2016, with the aim of bringing health and social care services together. The NHS Long-Term Plan, published in 2019 set the ambition that every STP should become an integrated care system by 2021. There will be 42 integrated care systems covering all of England, each tasked with bringing health and social care services together to work more efficiently and effectively and improve outcomes and services for their local populations. 

NCVO followed nine of these areas during 2018/19 that were funded by NHS England to build stronger partnerships with their voluntary sector and work out how the voluntary sector can be more engaged strategically. Through this work, NCVO identified five essential components that ensured that the partnerships with the voluntary sector were robust, sustainable and effective. One of these was ‘principles for joint working’. 

The issues we faced

Salford Community and Voluntary Services (Salford CVS) had a positive and advanced relationship with public sector bodies through a local partnership Salford Together, working together to  transform health and social care. To formalise and underpin these relationships and engagement processes we produced several documents.  

The actions we took

We created a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Salford’s voluntary sector, through the Salford CVS Co-ordinated VOCAL Forums. This gives the voluntary sector an equitable role in Salford Together as a key strategic partner in health, social care and well-being. 

Partners then created a collaboration agreement which provides the tools to deliver the ambitions set out in the MoU, enabling partners to provide the best services and support for the people of Salford. 

Positive outcomes

Positive approaches and relationships between voluntary sector partners and the health and social care sector have encouraged collaboration, built trust and enabled transformational work.

The MoU gives the voluntary sector an equitable role in Salford Together as a key strategic partner in health, social care and well-being activities which will achieve the outcomes described in Salford’s Locality Plan.

The Collaboration Agreement provides the tools to deliver the ambitions set out in the MoU to:

    • provide the best services and support for the people of Salford
    • co-design these services
    • maximise the talent, reach and social value of voluntary sector activity for the benefit of the people of Salford.

One of the key achievements of the relationship between Salford CVS and Salford Together is the creation of a ‘Partnership Lead’ role that ensures that the voluntary sector is formally and consistently represented within the strategic planning and delivery of the health and social care transformation work.

The Partnership Lead is the ‘bridge’ between the voluntary sector and Salford Together to ensure that the sector has voice, representation (which there is backfill funding to support) and influence in strategic planning and delivery.

Enabling factors were: 

  • Backfill funding for a partnership coordinator
  • Genuine desire to involve the voluntary sector at a strategic and operational level and openness to collaboration. 

Negative outcomes

  1. The fast pace of change in the wider system can be a challenge, for example we are yet to be fully engaged with our local Primary Care Networks that were introduced in the early summer of 2019
  2. While we have secured the principle of a VCSE sector representative on strategic boards, the frequency and length of meetings make ensuring that we take up the seats a challenge. 

Lessons learnt

Positive approaches and relationships between sector partners and the health and social care sector have encouraged collaboration, built trust and enabled transformational work.

 

Contributor

Page last edited Jan 16, 2020

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