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How to Transform Your Nonprofit Board into a Fundraising Machine

Congratulations, you have started a non-profit organization and are ready to accomplish big. However, for some reason you’re starting to sense that some of your board members don’t demonstrate the kind of commitment you expect from them. Bummer.

There are many reasons that can explain this problem. For example, they might be fairly new to the field and have no prior experience in fundraising. Or maybe you don’t motivate them as well as needed? You might be surprised but some of them may actually be afraid of asking people for money.

Whatever the reason is, you need to eliminate this issue and get your organization rolling. Below are some tips to help you with that.

Things you'll need

  • Strategies to turn board members into skillful fundraisers
1

Start simply

First and foremost, a non-profit organization should begin by developing and implementing an easy fundraising plan that eliminates all challenges, both psychological and tactical. Make the process as simple and comfortable as possible to make sure that board members feel excited and ready to go. Consider giving them a lot of power in raising the funds as well. If they have insufficient opportunities for managing the process, it is highly likely that engagement will remain inadequate.

2

Train them

Victory loves preparation. One of the most important aspects in preparation is training, so it must be delivered to improve your chances for success. Have your fundraising professionals and experts provide training on various approaches and assess the performance of the board. 

Learning from professionals is not only a legitimate technique but also a chance to enhance motivation and bring new ideas to the table. 

3

Set expectations

Each member of the board is expected to provide his or her share. Even before you invite somebody to join your organization, you already have a vision of the mission of that person. To make sure that you and your board members are on the same page on that, clear expectations should be set.

Let everyone know that you expect a certain kind of commitment and performance. A non-profit will not be successful if expectations are not created and communicated clearly to the board. Simply saying, there is no way this is happening until you take care of expectations

4

Empower introverts

Don’t neglect the skills of quiet board members because they may be the best in this business. Allow them to express their thoughts and propositions freely and eliminate the impact of strong extraverts who are constantly trying to turn them off. Introverts are known as committed and talented people in both non-profit and profit areas, so their skills should not be underestimated.

There are many ways in which introverts in your organization can be empowered. For example, you can leave them out of the open office, talk with them in private, and provide them with sufficient opportunities to be heard. 

5

Teach persistence

Many non-profit organizations have failed because the management was not persistent enough to deliver. For example, they gave up after hosting one of two fundraisers because the results were unsatisfactory. To avoid this, you need to adopt “One fundraiser isn’t enough” approach and communicate it to the board.

By joining you in the relentless effort to succeed, board members will dramatically increase the chances of achieving the goals. Moreover, they will anticipate failures, so they will maintain their focus even after getting upsetting results. 

6

Encourage knowledge sharing

This technique is actually very simple and effective. For example, there are some board members who are comfortable with fundraising while the others – not so much. Why not pairing them? Perhaps those who are the least comfortable with asking for money need some motivation from members with experience and talent.

This technique is actually very simple and effective. For example, there are some board members who are comfortable with fundraising while the others – not so much. Why not pairing them? Perhaps those who are the least comfortable with asking for money need some motivation from members with experience and talent.

As the result of pairing, the knowledge will be shared because not-so-experienced members will be mentored.

As the result of pairing, the knowledge will be shared because not-so-experienced members will be mentored.

7

Be aimed at the results

In some cases, a disconnect exists between the mission of the organization and fundraising. As the result, board members may not understand how raising funds contributes to the overall development of the organization. 

Having a blog or a website is a good option for a fundraising campaign. Useful and fresh content always attracts visitors or even potential contributors. Having a professional writer from College papers, Emergencyessays or Admission service essay writing companies is a good opt even for the non-profit organization.

8

Provide literature

There are plenty of books for fundraisers. Some of the most popular ones include Making Money with Donor Newsletters by Tom Ahern, The Essential Fundraising Handbook for Small Nonprofits by Marc A. Pitman, Sandy Rees, & Sherry Truhlar, and Retention Fundraising by Roger Craver. Provide these books to your board members to expand their knowledge of non-profit business. 

For more on reading list for non-profit fundraisers check out this article from Classy

Further information

Each of the board members wants to fundraise, and you should realize it. They care about the cause and success, otherwise they wouldn’t be with you. However, if you have some difficulties with motivating and getting them started, use these tips to create an impact on the board. Happy fundraising! 

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Page last edited Jun 23, 2017 History

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