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Grievance procedure

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An example grievance procedure.

Below is an example of a grievance procedure, designed for a small not-for-profit employer that is adhering to statutory minimum requirements. It does not constitute legal advice.

The procedure is taken from the ACAS publication Discipline and Grievances at Work – The ACAS guide (2009) (pdf, 850KB).

As with all policies it should be consistent with your terms and conditions of employment as well as your culture and aspirations. There is no one-size-fits-all.

Download a Microsoft Word version of this example policy (Word, 60KB)

Example policy

Dealing with grievances informally

If you have a grievance or complaint to do with your work or the people you work with you should, wherever possible, start by talking it over with your manager. You may be able to agree a solution informally between you.

Formal grievance

If the matter is serious and/or you wish to raise the matter formally you should set out the grievance in writing to your manager. You should stick to the facts and avoid language that is insulting or abusive.

Where your grievance is against your manager and you feel unable to approach him or her you should talk to another manager.

Grievance hearing

Your manager will call you to a meeting, normally within five days, to discuss your grievance. You have the right to be accompanied by a colleague or trade union representative at this meeting if you make a reasonable request.

After the meeting the manager will give you a decision in writing, normally within 24 hours.

Appeal

If you are unhappy with your manager’s decision and you wish to appeal you should let your manager know.

You will be invited to an appeal meeting, normally within five days, and your appeal will be heard by a more senior manager (or the company owner). You have the right to be accompanied by a colleague or trade union representative at this meeting if you make a reasonable request.

After the meeting the manager will give you a decision, normally within 24 hours. The manager’s decision is final.

Download a Microsoft Word version of this example policy (Word, 60KB)

Page last edited Jun 11, 2019

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